A Wash Out? Oh no - pale is very interesting! - Giles Landscapes CMS
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A Wash Out? Oh no – pale is very interesting!

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There seems to be a quiet trend emerging for a very unusual colour palette of ghostly grey-violets and pale, almost not there colours evoking the tattered, faded remains of 1920’s silk and lace lingerie and nightwear… Ghostly whispers of blooms reminiscent of dusty boudoirs misty with the powder and perfume of days long gone, coming alive with possibilities planted alongside more showy varieties.

These faded gems are quite hard to find at the moment but I predict that we are just at the start of their popularity and I don’t think it will be long before our gardens are awash with the washed out!

If you fancy giving these spectral beauties some garden space, inject some blood into their veins with bright orange companion planting such as Geum Prinses Juliana or Achillea Walther Funcke and then sit back and let them haunt you with their gentle whispers.

Here are some of my favourites…

Iris Topolino like a faded pair of French knickers in a flower! Easy to grow and a generous flowerer.

iris

 

Aconitum Stainless Steel brrrr this ice maiden loves semi shade and will flower from June to August.

Aconitum%20Stainless%20Steel

 

Delphinium Requienii like a ghostly Miss Faversham veil floating up through the border planted as seed, this biennial (unlike Miss Haversham) loves basking in the sun.

Delphinium requienii

 

Larkspur Earl Grey hard to find seeds but beautiful grey to pale mauve spears an annual that deserves space in the border whichever colour you decide to go for.

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Rosa Blue Moon a front garden favourite from the 1970’s set to make a more enigmatic comeback. When planted amongst softer, hazy perennials be prepared to fall in love with this misunderstood, solemn apparition.

climbing-blue-moon-roses-2

Keep a watch out for more pale phantoms infiltrating our garden centres in the future but in the meantime also look out for sweet violets (Viola odorata) and their hybrids making a big comeback… As soon as they do, these washed out wonders won’t be far behind them…

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